9: Hast Thou Slain the Jabberwork? Hagg Wood, Yorkshire

This project looks at the philosophy and experience of walking from a feminist environmentalist perspective. It explores my own memories and experiences of walking alone along a path when I was a teenager on the ‘edgeland’ outskirts of Manchester.

It takes the same set of photographs and sketchbook drawings from a walk through Hagg Wood in the Holme Valley, Yorkshire managed by the Woodland Trust. But develops and interprets them in very different ways with very different messages.

1.1 Trees Talking

Trees Talking‘ is a sunny colour moving image interpretation – how things actually looked and sounded including audio of a beautiful dawn chorus in May. Linked to the work of the Woodland Trust, the project builds on scientific research on the ways in which trees link and ‘talk’ to each other and the possibilities for caring for trees. Raising the question of whether ‘edges’ between them and us actually exist.

I start with colour experiments with selected images from photographs and my sketchbook using creative prompts to explore different interpretations.

Inspired by Stanley Brakhage and Stanley Donwood.

1.2 And Hast Though Slain the Jabberwock?

An ‘edgy’ moving image narrative in high contrast Black and White based on the poem Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll. is an ‘edgy’ black and white moving image interpretation – the way I felt and sounds exaggerated or invented – about how the threat of male violence affects women’s experience of walking, even in apparently ‘safe’ environments. Inspired particularly by the photography of Daido Moriyama, but also the prints of Emil Dore and others.

develops the black and white images from my sketchbook and photo series in different ways for Scraperboard drawings, monoprints and photolithography prints.

It plays on fears around violence and male threats to both women and the environment.

Sketchbook Walk

Pencil Sketches on location

This first project explores different perspectives and visual interpretations of Hagg Wood.

Uses these as the basis for scraperboard and Photolithography printmaking.

Animated concertina sketchbook.

Photographic Creativity

The inspiration started with the images I had taken on the walk in 2017, a very sunny day with flickering light and shadow. I found them very interesting when I converted the colour images to high contrast Black and White in Lightroom.

The first image of the light coming down the path in particular reminded me of the poem Jabberwocky – but a rather sinister version. This had been a favourite poem of mine when I was a child. I researched the poem in Wikipedia and followed the weblinks from there to find out more about the meaning of the words as intended by Lewis Carol.
Jaberwocky annotated text (to be re-edited with comments).

1) Light on the Path
Tree Paths
Dandelions and Ferns

Shoe Drowning

Scraperboard Experiments

Photolithography (forthcoming 2022)

My starting point and initial inspiration for this assignment was a short 6-page booklet using high contrast monochrome photographs taken in May 2015 illustrating the poem ‘Jabberwocky’ for Book Design Image and Text Project 3.2. The background photomontages were produced in Photoshop from high contrast black and white photographs of trees, shadows, reflections, litter and other artefacts from an ‘Edgelands’ walk through Hagg Wood along the river Holme.

I worked directly in Photoshop to crop, blend and manipulate the images with the text. My first version was a bit choppy because of the small photos and my tutor thought the font and text too upbeat. In the final version above I did a lot more work on the images(eg the white dandelion and image joins) and type layout in Photoshop and changed the typeface to a more ‘spiky’ Nueva Std.

Development of the Moving Image animation

I completely rework the original print document as an animation in Adobe After Effects, with adapted feminist text, increasing the sense of violence and edginess of the images – contrasting the sometimes flippant language of Jabberwocky with the very real fear (and adrenaline rush) that I and many other women feel when walking alone in the ‘peri-urban countryside’. Particularly women who were young at the time of the Cambridge and Yorkshire Rippers (See my post ‘A Subjective Voice’ on my Landscape Photography blog).

Drawing on discussions around landscape photography, psychogeography, ‘walking’ and ‘Edgelands’ it explores our often conflicting attitudes and political conflicts around the ‘natural’ landscape. It draws particularly on feminist landscape photography and landscape photography by women and explores the contradictions between frisson and fear, and the real dangers of assault in striding out for freedom.

Edited from Book Design 1: Image and Text Text 1

Click here for PDF: Jaberwocky 2017  (design copyrighted)

They reminded me of the poem Jabberwocky – but a rather sinister version. This had been a favourite poem of mine when I was a child. I researched the poem in Wikipedia and followed the weblinks from there to find out more about the meaning of the words as intended by Lewis Carol.
Jaberwocky_annotated text (see comments).

I worked directly in Photoshop to crop, blend and manipulate the images with the text. My first version was a bit choppy because of the small photos and my tutor thought the font and text too upbeat. In the final version above I did a lot more work on the images(eg the white dandelion and image joins) and type layout in Photoshop and changed the typeface to a more ‘spiky’ Nueva Std.

Project 3.2 Illustrating Text

TASK
Choose two texts of up to six pages each to illustrate. Make sure that you choose texts with quite different requirements, for example a novel and an art history textbook or a book of verse and a business manual. Once you’ve selected some images, plan how you would integrate each one into the text. Give careful thought to the size and orientation of the images as well as techniques like cutting or bleeding.
Generate an enlarged copy of each of your chosen texts and mark up where and how you would illustrate them. For each image, write short notes, for example ‘cut-out image, approx. x cm by y cm’. Don’t overdo it. Remember that the illustrations are there to complement and enhance the text – not to distract the reader’s attention.

Text 1: Artistic poem: Jabberwocky

Jabberwocky front cover
Jabberwocky 2-3
Jabberwocky 4-5
Jabberwocky 6-7
Jabberwocky 8

Click here for PDF: Jaberwocky 2017  (design copyrighted)

This was an idea I have been thinking about as part of some work on Art Photography for illustrating poems, but I had never followed up on the ideas till now. The inspiration here started with the images I had taken on a walk in Holmfirth, a very sunny day with flickering light and shadow. I found them very interesting when I converted the colour images to high contrast Black and White. They reminded me of the poem Jabberwocky – but a rather sinister version. This had been a favourite poem of mine when I was a child. I researched the poem in Wikipedia and followed the weblinks from there to find out more about the meaning of the words as intended by Lewis Carol.

Jaberwocky_annotated text (see comments).

This is one of the pieces I am most proud of from my work in this course – I enjoyed doing this very much. This is the sort of work I would be very interested in pursuing further.

I worked directly in Photoshop to crop, blend and manipulate the images with the text. My first version was a bit choppy because of the small photos and my tutor thought the font and text too upbeat. In the final version above I did a lot more work on the images(eg the white dandelion and image joins) and type layout in Photoshop and changed the typeface to a more ‘spiky’ Nueva Std.